Agora

In ancient Athens, the agora was the central location where citizens gathered to hear news, discuss and, later, trade. The agora was the heart of the city’s political, cultural and spiritual life and it gave birth to the Greek word for speaking in public: ἀγορεύω (agorevo). It is this spirit we hope to channel in this section of the website.

Here, the Agora is a public forum for discussing events that are unfolding in Greece and beyond. Contributors to Macropolis, as well as guest posters, share their views on political, economic and other matters, while also offering readers the opportunity to express their opinions. As always, those who fail to respect the sanctity of this forum will not be allowed to share in its benefits.

Results 316 to 320 out of 351.

Greece in 2014: The risks and opportunities of moving forward

As Greece assumes the rotating EU presidency for six months in January 2014, we ask what lies ahead for the country, its political economy and how will its citizens fare? This inquiry is not only focused on the first six months of the year, until the political authorities hand over the presidential responsibilities to their Mediterranean EU peer Italy at the end of June. Instead, we seek to address the issue of what are the risks and opportunities for Greece moving forward in the coming year?

Contributor: Jens Bastian

3 Comment(s)

Categories: Greece (310), Politics (212), Economy (216)

What would Willy do?

One hundred years ago, on 18 December 1913, the former German Chancellor and Nobel Peace Prize Winner Willy Brandt was born in Lübeck. The charismatic leader of the German Social Democratic Party and the Socialist International, who died 1992, has not ceased to inspire politicians and academics around the world with his books, speeches and especially his courageous foreign policy – the new Ostpolitik.

Contributor: Christos Katsioulis

1 Comment(s)

Categories: Politics (212), Europe (158)

Photo by Myrto Papadopoulos [www.myrtopapadopoulos.com] Cyprus in 2014: Looking ahead

Cyprus has the habit of grabbing international attention in a global way, only to then be marginalised as a footnote when the immediate crisis seems to have abated. This has been historically true in issues of communal violence and the Annan plan, in what we Cypriots call “the original Cyprus problem”. Sadly for Cyprus, this is also seems to hold true in regards to its financial crisis.

Contributor: Alexander Apostolides

0 Comment(s)

Categories: Politics (212), Economy (216)

Results 316 to 320 out of 351.